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Website Sample: Environment Agency

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Copy and Articles for Environment Agency

Brief: To create easy-to-read, lively intro copy and website text, using search-engine friendly keywords.

Buying Better Compost

[Sub-heading]
Help the Planet with Peat-Free Compost

 

[Intro]
For truly green gardening, it’s important to use peat-free compost wherever you can. New gardeners often don’t realise that harvesting peat-based compost destroys peatland habitats and wildlife, and releases CO2 emissions that harm the environment.

The good news is, you can lower your CO2 emissions immediately by using peat-free compost for the majority of your gardening needs. If you can’t buy peat-free, look for compost with a lower peat content (60% or less).

Learn more about using peat-free compost:

 

[Anchor links]
Buy better compost – starting now
Use peat-free all around the garden
Grow a greener, bigger, better garden
The muddy topic of money
But I have to use peat-based compost!

Buy better compost – starting now

 

All garden centres now stock sustainable, peat-free composts, which include products made from wood-bark, green-waste compost, other wood waste and wood fibre and coir (made from coconut husks). You can also buy recycled peat from spent mushroom compost. The key to CO2-free compost is sustainability – if you buy compost that is sustainable, you will minimise the impact on the environment. Peat takes thousands of years to form, which means neither the CO2 it releases, nor the habitat it destroys, will be readily replaced.

[Link: ‘Where to buy better’ - B&Q website?]

 

Use peat-free all around the garden
Peat-free compost alternatives work very well all around the garden, as long as you follow the correct instructions. By and large, you can use peat-free compost wherever you would have used peat compost, such as in pots, growbags, hanging baskets or flower beds. In fact, there are only a few specialist uses for which peat-based compost might be preferable.

 

Grow a greener, bigger, better garden
Often, you can achieve better gardening results with peat-free compost, provided you use it as instructed. Some peat-free composts have different watering and feeding requirements, but as long as you follow each compost’s specific instructions there’s no reason why your garden shouldn’t flourish.

[Link: ‘Gardening with peat-free compost’ - Act on CO2 website]

 

The muddy topic of money
Peat-free compost tends to cost around 20% more than peat-based compost, but when you consider the environmental benefits of buying peat-free, that’s a small price to pay. Also, peat-free compost often performs better than peat-based products, which justifies a higher price tag and explains why experienced gardeners buy it by the bucket-load.

 

But I have to use peat-based compost!
Although you don’t need peat compost for most garden purposes, there are some specialist uses for which it is necessary for the best results. For example, if you are growing carnivorous plants that are native to peat bogs, or certain varieties of ericaceous plants native to moorlands, peat alternatives may not work as well. If you absolutely must use peat compost, try to buy products with a lower peat content (ideally lower than 60% peat).

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